The Title is On the Painting and My Grant Proposal

BLow
2019. Oil on canvas, 72 x 55″

I have made a request to the SUNY Oswego powers that be for wall space anywhere on old campus where Roy might have passed en route to class or glass of milk in the student union.

I have 152 hours of labor into the project, yet only a quarter of the way to its finish. This is a good time to post several pieces of my grant proposal, so those interested in acquiring funds can see for themselves that any boob is capable of winning.

Feel free to copy for yourselves. Just change out the names, and see where it can take you. I estimate a wage of $.17/hour.

The world wants artists to shut up, cease art, and work retail for millionaires. I say if you must, then get a job and somewhere to live, and then undermine the millionaires with as much art as you can pop out. Flood the market to destroy the market!

Artist Statement:

A long-established writer, Ron Throop relatively recently began exhibiting his paintings. They are direct visual counterparts to his writings that ask us to reconsider mankind’s current wayward course, and simultaneously promote the simple pleasure found in creativity, nature, family and friends. With color, straightforward drawing and scrawled inscriptions, Throop’s style initially suggests the work of a naïve artist detached from mainstream 21st century concerns. Upon further consideration, we discover they offer no quaint story or escapist pleasure. As in a children’s story, both the people and animals of the land communicate their complex thoughts which are of the utmost seriousness.

Briefly explain how you estimated/calculated these numbers:

I am an avid promoter of Stuckist painters and have ample outreach through social media and community contacts. I shall create a blog documenting my process with original paintings, articles, and inspired essays. I use Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and my website to interact with the public on social media. Since this project involves a history of a famous artist who taught at SUNY Oswego, I intend to involve the college to the best of my ability. I have worked with M., director of Tyler Art Galley, on a previous project and hope to garner his expertise through advice and direction. Likewise, I shall seek direction from the Oswego County Historical Society and Special Collections of SUNY Oswego to fashion a 1950’s, early 1960’s backdrop to the Lichtenstein story. I hope to liason with ARTSwego and the Art Association of Oswego in some manner to help with outreach to the community. Finally, the published book will reach audiences of the present and future, as I will seek circulation in SUNY Oswego Penfield Library and local retail outlets.
I actually believe these numbers to be rather conservative estimates. With success, it could attract many more, but no less.

Concept:

This is a creative local art history project to add color and pride to a region limited in art scope. I shall complete 25 or more original oil paintings inspired by a late 1950’s and early 1960’s Oswego that Lichtenstein might have experienced—thoughts on a lakeside walk, sights while driving throughout the town and countryside, or taking the family out for a movie downtown. I will show these paintings in the autumn in either Tyler or Park Hall/Wilbur Hall on the SUNY Campus. Preferably the latter. Few know that Lichtenstein was hired by SUNY Oswego to teach Industrial Design, not painting. Park Hall is the Industrial Arts building where he would have taught his classes in the late 1950’s.
I will conduct ample research and compile my illustrations and essays in a book specifically for this show, and donate all profits from sales to a chosen SUNY Oswego college scholarship fund that helps fund Oswego County applicants.
While painting and conducting research I will maintain a blog with social media connection to specific Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook accounts.

Project description:

Lichtenstein taught Industrial Design at Oswego from 1958 to 1960, and although his tenure was brief, there is a wealth of historical fact and fiction that can be expressed, through both visual art and historical research. My next door neighbor Helen, age 89, knew the Lichtensteins, and related a story to me that Isabel Lichtenstein (Roy’s wife), once caused a stir at the Oswego faculty wives’ dinner when she came dressed in red stockings!
Well, as any painter or writer will tell you, that is a story that needs to be told!
Word has it that Roy and family rented a house on West Sixth Street Street in the city of Oswego, and while living here and teaching at the college, he changed his style of painting from figurative to abstract, where he would apply broad swaths of color onto the canvas, wrap a rag around his arm, and drag it to get the desired results. He was also sketching comics during this time, so a feel of this style would be most appropriate for new work that I introduce.
I paint with acrylics on any substrate I feel most suitable. For this body of work I think I would like to mirror Lichtenstein’s choices—closer to the bone, the better. For instance, if Roy painted on canvas, I would seek mid-twentieth century linens, canvas, sheets, etc. and stretch them as Lichtenstein would have. Likewise, and this truly would be a monumental change for me—Like Roy, I would use oils, a medium I have little to no experience with, which will make me feel how Lichtenstein must have felt between artistic realizations. That is, to say the least, uneasy.
While painting and researching Lichtenstein’s life in Oswego, I will connect to the public via a professionally designed blog with links to social media such as Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. I will contact the Lichtenstein Foundation to seek reference and consul, and as mentioned before, work with college and community art and historical interests to learn and also promote the exhibition and book.
Finally, the book will be a work of original art in itself—the story of Roy Lichtenstein in Oswego, and the color added to it with my original paintings commemorating his experience and mine.

Audience:

Since I will display the work in a prominent building at the college, preferably in a busy thoroughfare, I would suspect the primary audience for the duration of the exhibition to be students, faculty, administration and staff of the college. However, an opening will welcome and push for a large community attendance, especially seniors who will benefit from the memory of an Oswego many share together. I would spend time promoting the event to administrators and residents of local senior housing, but also middle and high school art and industrial arts teachers, with hopes that their interest is sparked and students are encouraged to attend. For a time, Oswego housed and fed a future world renown painter. What a positive story for local youth to see that greatness can be achieved, or at least nourished, in underrepresented geographic locations! Again, connection with the Oswego Historical Society, ARTswego, the Art Association of Oswego, Tyler Art Gallery, etc. will boost an interest outside my reach and hopefully encourage even more to attend. The book, of course, will provide historical documentation, and be accessible for future interest.
Why do this for the community?
It’s just a great local art story that needs to be told.

Community connection:

I am excited about meeting with the Oswego Historical Society, Special Collections at SUNY Oswego, and the several art institutions previously mentioned. Local history is a prime interest here among many, (as I’m sure it is everywhere where people feel deeply connected to a region). Roy Lichtensteins’s Oswego story is good local history, and an artistic embellishment will add a modern, living component that is not often achievable with historic storytelling. I am, as Lichtenstein was for several years during his life, a struggling artist with connections to both the city and college at Oswego. I graduated from the college, yet unlike Roy, made Oswego my permanent residence. A good comparison might be a local resident and wealthy social activist recounting a time in the life of Gerrit Smith, a prominent landowner/businessperson and committed reformer of the mid 19th century.
Also, I intend to interview several living persons who at best know the story of Lichtenstein, or at least are very knowledgeable about Oswego during Roy’s tenure here. For instance, my neighbor Helen may know others who were friends with the Lichtensteins, and can liason an interview(s) for me. I am curious to discover what the local historical society might know, and also Special Collections at SUNY Oswego. I will connect with M., the Director of the Tyler Art Gallery at SUNY who oversees the entire art archive of the college, to find out what he knows about Lichtenstein’s only public exhibition in Oswego—a group faculty show at the college in 1958.
Roy lived at two residences in Oswego. He once hosted art students to display their work in his house on West Sixth Street. I often show the work of other painters in my house. Roy didn’t know it at the time, but he was a burgeoning Stuckist painter, however, the movement hadn’t been invented yet!
My own friends and acquaintances who attend regular home shows, will share their experience and perhaps expand this exhibition’s audience. I’m friends with firemen, administrators, retirees, bankers, professors, air conditioning repairmen, as well as visual artists and musicians. I have no one social circle. Art doesn’t allow for it.
Once again, I will document this process with blog and social media to culminate in a 5 week long exhibition of original paintings and published book.

Outreach and promotion:

Immediately after notification of grant in January, I will purchase a blog with domain name “Lichtenstein in Oswego, 1957 – 1960”, and site specific accounts with Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Then I will get to work, posting regularly paintings and process, but also accounts (visual and written) of trips locally where I shall document the ongoing historical research, and discoveries about Oswego in the 1950’s and 60’s, with particular emphasis on Roy Lichtenstein and his connections with the people and places of the time period.
Toward end of research, book creation and completed paintings, I shall begin marketing and advertising the project and exhibition. I will create and send a press release to Oswego County news organizations and pray for free press. I will use some grant funding on postcard and poster promotion, and much of my time networking on social media and taking time to visit elder care facilities, educators, and art historians to pitch the opening event and ensuing exhibition.

Timeline:

January—Purchase and set up blog and social media accounts. Purchase oil paints, gather (sometimes purchase) unique, age-appropriate substrate, and begin painting.
Design and create template for book to be published print-on-demand, and profits to be donated to a SUNY Oswego scholarship fund for Oswego County High School students.
Begin research on Roy Lichtenstein, read biographies, use resources online, set up future meetings with Oswego Historical Society, Special Collections at SUNY Oswego, etc, and form a narrative for book while posting progress online in aforementioned sites.
Write/call the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation in New York City to inquire about photo rights and reproductions. Also get the know on what they know about Roy in Oswego.
January – March—Schedule meeting(s) with heads of art and industrial arts departments to inquire and acquire wall space for exhibition. Set exact dates for the exhibition and its opening.
January – August—Continue painting, compiling research, setting narrative and typesetting book with prose and several illustrations.
By end of August complete book and send to publisher.
August – September—Have artwork ready to hang and begin implementing marketing/advertising plan.
Send out press release to local news organizations.
Create and print postcards and 11 x 17″ posters to distribute throughout Oswego County.
Connect with elder care facilities, research and art institutions, librarians, teachers city leaders and politicians, SUNY Oswego community, SUNY alumni, overall begin the invitation process to all and sundry.

Qualifications and experience:

I have been a full time practicing fine art painter and writer for over 20 years, and have exhibited for 10 years. I have written and self-published 16 books with subjects on art, society, culture, politics and self-liberation. I am proficient in book design, proofreading and typesetting, with knowledge of the self-publishing industry.
I have a heightened sense of work ethic. Since 2016, I have curated three international group exhibitions, and two international solo exhibitions, as well as several of my own. The first of the former I hosted the work of 4 Russian painters and myself and exhibited to the Oswego community in a truly inspirational endeavor (thank you CNYArts!). The second group show was more daunting with work sent from 37 Stuckist painters around the world which I exhibited at beautiful Quintus Gallery in Watkins Glen. Both huge successes, and literally life-changing. The third was an international show representing 12 artists exhibited in my home. Last year I curated the work of Spanish painter, Lupo Sol, exhibited in Hamilton, N.Y. Presently I am curating the work of Lena Ulanova, a Saint Petersburg, Russian painter. I took one of her paintings to New York City and filmed it outside of famous museums and art galleries while asking random people to pose with the piece. These recent exhibitions, as well as several solo shows of my own, have been at my expense, except for the first mentioned. I feel a strong communion with other artists and am glad to help.

Work samples:

Since the project is multidisciplinary I will provide recent work that pays homage to other painters, or provides an example of a non-traditional substrate. For example, the first image will be of painters I promoted in 2016, Alexey Stepanov and Andrew Makarov. I try to capture the unique cultural differences and similarities shared internationally by all artists while they await a train to take them and their paintings to Saint Petersburg. Included will be images of a baby seal and one of a parakeet to provide examples of using substrate to build a concept: a bed sheet and parakeet cover respectively. Also a sample of writing from a book I published for an international exhibition. Lastly, a promotional video (one of 4) I made while curating “Yellow Life Scenes” by Lupo Sol. I wrote and performed the original song. Widely shared across social media.
Please note, the work for this exhibition will be entirely new. Remember, I have never painted with oils! Also, the book will be vibrant, alive and colorful with history and rich illustration. Impossible to replicate for panel with these limitations of past work, however imagine paintings in a similar style to Lichtenstein during this period of internal peace and tumult. History tends to distort the day to day life of any past person, especially the celebrity type. I intend to include the mundane of a painter’s world, expressed in paint and in prose.

Financial narrative:

Although I will use the bulk of the grant to pay for my time, I will also use funds for oil paints, custom substrate, blog creation and promotional marketing costs. As is probably very common among past awardees, the $2,500 is a huge benefit to any artistic labor of love that sees a majority of time invested pro bono. Basically I see no need to secure additional funding. I plan to donate my time to the project.